Dog Lichens

These specimens from the genus Peltigara, are known as dog lichens. There are 90 or so species of dog lichens worldwide, and 34 are common to North America. Even though recognizing the group as a whole is fairly easy, species identification is more difficult.

I found these lichens on a heavily moss covered rock substrates in an area that receives some sun, but also a fair amount of shade.

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10 Responses to Dog Lichens

  1. Wow, they’re quite substantial. Do any animals eat these?

  2. montucky says:

    Excellent photos. I see that at least a couple species of these live in my area and these look somewhat familiar. I will now have to start looking at lichens more closely. There are lots of lichens here, but I haven’t concentrated on them even though many are very pretty and I do know several that are beneficial to the local wildlife.

  3. Finn Holding says:

    More amazing lichen shots. I’ve never seen one like that before, I think you must have alot more species in the US than we do in the UK.

    I was on the east coast over the last couple of days and took some pictures of some green feathery lichens on a tree when I got to wondering about the taxonomy. They have the conventional binomial nomenclature as all other species, but they consist of a fungus and an alga which each have their own binomens. Are they the only obligate symbiants that have their own and a combined name?

  4. Pingback: Suffolk Symbionts | The Naturephile

  5. Miranti says:

    beautiful!

  6. Pingback: Freckle Pelt Lichens | btweenblinks

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