Tiger Swallowtail

I have set a goal for myself to start learning how to take photos of things that move. This means I will need to tinker with the shutter speed and other settings and not just rely upon the auto mode.

Below is one of my first attempts. Unfortunately, I ran out of storage room on my camera after only two shots of this butterfly, and in my excitement to clear some room before my subject flew away, I deleted the photos I had just taken (I’m sure they were the best of the bunch). I was only able to get a few more before the opportunity was gone.

This is a female Tiger Swallowtail. It feeds upon the nectar of several flowers, including this white lilac. The female pictured is distinguished from males by its more dominant blue patches displayed on the bottom of the hindwings.

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7 Responses to Tiger Swallowtail

  1. skadhu says:

    Gorgeous. Butterflies are challenging. They seem to just kind of bumble along slowly, but it’s deceiving!

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  2. This is a lovely set! I’m impressed with this first attempt! These are beautiful shots. I wish you could see me trying to photograph butterflies; it’s got to be quite a sight for people looking in from the outside. I tend to get right up on my subjects, and spend lots of time being as still as possible hoping they’ll come my way or that I can inch my way closer. Butterflies generally don’t allow one to “get right up on” them. Believe me, I’ve tried it countless times. 🙂

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  3. montucky says:

    Butterflies can be difficult. Thank goodness for digital!

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  4. Finn Holding says:

    She’s a magnificent and aptly named creature. I can wholeheartedly concur with the comments about how photographically challenging they can be. But extremely satisfying when you get a good one!

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  5. I was lucky enough to get a shot of the same kind of butterfly earlier this year but I think it was because the poor thing was exhausted. The trailing edge of one wing looked like a bird had taken pieces of it. Good luck with moving targets!

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